angelgazing:

BEST TELEVISION MOMENT EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER

EVER

BECAUSE AT THE END OF THE FIGHT WITH NOTHING LEFT

BUFFY KEPT FIGHTING

BUFFY WAS ENOUGH TO SAVE THE WORLD

SHE DIDN’T NEED ANYTHING BUT HERSELF TO SEE IT THROUGH

DO YOU REALIZE HOW OFTEN GIRLS GET TO SEE THAT? HOW OFTEN THEY ARE TOLD OR SHOWN THAT? LOOK KIDS! YOU ARE ENOUGH. JUST YOU JUST LIKE YOU ARE YOU ARE EXACTLY WHAT YOU NEED AND THAT IS THE GREATEST

EVER

(via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)

armalis:

sci-fi episodes i want:

  • ship’s computer crashes due to virus acquired during a porn download from a lower decks ensign
  • firmware update was pushed out to the fleet, has vital error in the clock program that causes every computer to repeat 2300. translators have to explain to the enemy why everyone is an hour late to peace talks.
  • unintelligble message is sent out into the void because someone’s pet cat walked across their keyboard. message is interpreted as a marriage proposal.
  • universal translators break, everyone is reduced to hand gestures
  • viewscreen has dead pixels in the upper left corner, drives the captain a bit bonkers
  • space gps tells us to take a right where we should take a left. plucky recent academy grad on the graveyard shift realizes that this would take us into the sun and makes the course correction. ship’s computer advises her for two hours to make a u-turn when it is safe to do so

(via spookynug)

…A young child born deaf in an indigenous North American nation grew up nearly always being able to communicate with her community. She would not be physically segregated. The expectation would be that if she survived the vagaries of life to which all were exposed, she could find and enjoy a partner, and she would eventually grow old as a treasured elder who tickled and guided the children around her. If all were in balance, she would find her gift—perhaps weaving, perhaps gathering particularly delicious herbs—and share that with her community, who would then share their gifts with her. A successful healing ceremony, if one was needed, would balance and resolve whatever unease might have existed—but certainly no one would expect the young girl to hear, for such a result was unnecessary.

Nearly every indigenous-language group used signed communication to some degree, and many nations shared singed languages despite their verbal difference. Europeans documented use of signed language among North American indigenous peoples as early as the sixteenth century, and anthropologists and linguists agree that it was employed long before contact with Europeans. Signed language has been identified within at least forty different language groups. Today, we know about indigenous signed languages because of its continued use by some elders, the anthropological work of scholars such as the Smithsonian’s Garrick Mallery in the late nineteenth century, films made by Hugh L. Scott in 1930 at the Indian Sign Language Council, and the tenacious scholarship and activism of contemporary linguists such as Jeffery E. Davis.

The most widely used signed language spread across an extensive region of the Great Plains, from Canada’s North Saskatchewan River to the Rio Grande, from the Rocky Mountain foothills to the Mississippi-Missouri valley. What is now referred to as Plains Indian Sign Language (PISL) enabled communication across communities regarding trade, in critical political negotiations, and even in courtship.Great Plains used this “signed lingua franca” as Davis has characterized it, within their communities as an alternative to spoken language for ritual or storytelling purposes—and of course as a primary language for deaf people and those around them.

A Disability History of America by Kim E. Nielsen, page 4 and 5 (via theaubisticagenda)

@

(via fromonesurvivortoanother)

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

owning-my-truth:

More than 4,000 Africans have died from Ebola and the crisis is continuing to escalate, grow and spiral out of control, displacing tens of thousands, killing entire families and instilling fear into the day to day lives of millions of people in West Africa and all white people care about is their fucking chocolate. Fuck Bill Tomson (@BillTomson4 on Twitter), white liberals and Politico (@Politico on Twitter) for this disgusting, racist trash.

(via lockedoutofhollywood)

There is no unmarked woman.

There is no woman’s hair style that can be called standard, that says nothing about her. The range of women’s hair styles is staggering, but a woman whose hair has no particular style is perceived as not caring about how she looks, which can disqualify her for many positions, and will subtly diminish her as a person in the eyes of some.

Women must choose between attractive shoes and comfortable shoes. When our group made an unexpected trek, the woman who wore flat, laced shoes arrived first. Last to arrive was the woman in spike heels, shoes in hand and a handful of men around her.

If a woman’s clothing is tight or revealing (in other words, sexy), it sends a message — an intended one of wanting to be attractive, but also a possibly unintended one of availability. If her clothes are not sexy, that too sends a message, lent meaning by the knowledge that they could have been. There are thousands of cosmetic products from which women can choose and myriad ways of applying them. Yet no makeup at all is anything but unmarked. Some men see it as a hostile refusal to please them.

Women can’t even fill out a form without telling stories about themselves. Most forms give four titles to choose from. “Mr.” carries no meaning other than that the respondent is male. But a woman who checks “Mrs.” or “Miss” communicates not only whether she has been married but also whether she has conservative tastes in forms of address — and probably other conservative values as well. Checking “Ms.” declines to let on about marriage (checking “Mr.” declines nothing since nothing was asked), but it also marks her as either liberated or rebellious, depending on the observer’s attitudes and assumptions.

After she came up to me and said, “I’ve been with my partner for 20 years… We would never get married because he’s on social security income, and because my daughter is disabled I have secondary income from the state to support my daughter. If I got married, both my benefits and his benefits would be reduced because we would become a double income family.”

She was explaining that marriage doesn’t work for poor people, and that it doesn’t work for disabled people. Having really simple examples like hers are important.